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Becoming a R1 DJ: GCSEs


SarahJayne.
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Hi all, I think this may be the right place (if there is one) to put this, but im really wondering which GCSEs I need to be a radio dj, as im in year nine, and hopefully choosing my options soon, and im crossed between being a childrens nurse, and a radio dj, which is such a random mix, but anyway.. anyone know?

Thanks in advance :)

x

'Dunlod got his dinkle in a deckchair mun'

*Must stop dreaming about Beccy in strange places*

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There's no clear cut answer to that! If only it was that easy! ;)

If you're going to college you just need to make sure you've got enough to get into college. Presumably you'll then want to study something like media production or radio production at university after that so you'd just need to get the required grades in A-Levels. Or you could study something else and get involved with university radio.

But again that's not necessary the answer. You could drop out after school and start building up experience at local radio stations, BBC stations, and hospital radio. You could even do some online like Mike here does. But this is always as a risk as you may end up giving up hope and having no degree.

You could, of course, go to university and have no experience and come out and build up your experience then.

Alternatively sleep with the bosses at Radio 1 and marry one. Fiona Philips at GMTV didn't do too badly out of it...

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Blimey. So the usual? Maths, science, english.. im gunna do ICT tooo....

Alternatively sleep with the bosses at Radio 1 and marry one. Fiona Philips at GMTV didn't do too badly out of it...

ahaha ;)

EDIT:

OOh, Ive just thought, maybe I want to be like Beccy, a co-producer, that just speaks occasionally on radio, instead of a full blown scott mills.

:P

Ive also realised I need to find a radio station to take me for my work experiance in year 10. :)

most probably the local radio station, Radio solent. I want to stay in bbc, not like a random one like '2CR' or uhm, something. ;)

Something else,

I just went on the BBC jobs area,

Your search was based on

Specialism: Radio - Regional

Region: South

Age Criteria: Eligible for 14 to 17 years old

Sorry, there are currently no opportunities that matched the criteria you used.

:(

Also,

Your search was based on

Specialism: Radio - Production, Drama & Entertainment

Region: South

Age Criteria: Eligible for 14 to 17 years old

Sorry, there are currently no opportunities that matched the criteria you used.

gah.

:(

Oh well.

Im gunna keep looking, and when I need to be looking, I will be emailing and poking them.

'Dunlod got his dinkle in a deckchair mun'

*Must stop dreaming about Beccy in strange places*

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Guest inxces4308

I'm currently working in Radio and to be honest with you most radio presenters dont have much of an education behind them because they concentrated on there talent. I have a full set of GCSEs and A Levels in Media, Computing and Music. But, i'm not a presenter....

In a fair world everyone that was talented at radio would have the right job but, because some people will offer their services for free/cheaper - companys will go with them. But the best way is to show them how good you are at something.

I currently work behind the scenes in Imaging and my route was as follows:

* Hospital Radio (Producing the odd jingles/programs)

* Small Commercial stations (i started as a Tech Op and slowly worked my way up)

And now i'm very very very very slightly (not particually) higher up within commercial radio doing imaging, still at a local/regional level. My aim is the BBC and its something im not going to give up on just yet.

The main thing to remember is no matter what, keep going. And, radio is full of people who like to backstab! So, beware!

Also,

Your search was based on

Specialism: Radio - Production, Drama & Entertainment

Region: South

Age Criteria: Eligible for 14 to 17 years old

Sorry, there are currently no opportunities that matched the criteria you used.

What is very annoying is that you have to be 18 to do work placements within radio at BBC. Perhaps try ringing your local station (BBC or commercial) and see what they say, even if just for advice.

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Here's a link to the BBC work experience positions

https://jobs.bbc.co.uk/fe/tpl_bbc03.asp?newms=info06

Study what you think will be useful for your career path (media and the like) spend some of your free time doing related work whether it's paid or volunteer. Internet radio, local radio, hospital etc.

even if it means getting a job at a radio station which is basic it could lead to you swapping departments within the company eventually.

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If you're looking to go to University and do a media type course, something like Broadcasting might be perfect.

I'm currently doing a Media Diploma at College and want to do Broadcasting at Falmouth University. I'm doing College Radio at the moment, and am planning on doing Hospital Radio next year. The more experience you've had with it, the better.

Good luck with it sweetheart!

xoxoxo

EDIT:

Here's a link for the Falmouth course, in case you wanted to see what kind of things university Courses in Broadcasting/media offer.

http://www.falmouth.ac.uk/201/courses-7/undergraduate-courses-42/broadcasting-bahons-56.html

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don't do Media Studies, they'll just laugh at you.

To be a Radio 1 DJ you just need to have talent. Greg did Drama at Uni and was scouted after the Student Radio awards.

You need experience and that's pretty much it.

But have a look at this page: http://www.bebo.com/TobyH99

He's the operations producer at Radio One. His video and Bebo page are quite interesting.

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Scott doesn't even have any GCSEs does he?

I imagine he was too old for GCSEs anyway ;) They've only been around since 1988.

It's difficult to even compare Scott's situation to modern day education as the whole system was different back then. Especially now Radio 1 favours celebrities and television stars and local radio groups are becoming huge networks.

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I imagine he was too old for GCSEs anyway ;) They've only been around since 1988.

So he would have been 14 when he took them but did he finish school? He went into local radio at 16 I believe so he might have left before the end of the year.

The geek formally known as Scott Mills Guru

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Hi all, I think this may be the right place (if there is one) to put this, but im really wondering which GCSEs I need to be a radio dj, as im in year nine, and hopefully choosing my options soon, and im crossed between being a childrens nurse, and a radio dj, which is such a random mix, but anyway.. anyone know?

Thanks in advance :)

x

What options have you got to choose from? Mine had nothing to do with radio! I did Media at A-Level and luckily got 100% overall in it, and am now doing Radio Journalism with Media at uni. Your best bet is doing radio with something else, then you've knowledge in lots of media areas and are handy for anything.

Alouette...deployer les ailes;

Alouette...plumerai les ailes.

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Work experience is the key. Im going to Uni in 2009 to study Journalism and I have a portfolio of stuff to show people at my Interview. Aslong as you have experience and a passion to work hard thats something else they're looking for.

I want to specialise in Broadcast Journalism but have chosen Journalism so I get skills of working and writing for different sectors especially as Online Journalism is growing. Also, if I change my mind and want to be the next Perez Hilton I havent studied Broadcast Journalism alone but Journalism.

twitter.com/emgreatorex

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I can't really add anything that everyone else hasn't said, but I'll just say what I'd do (and what I personally have done):

First of all, DO take Media Studies. No one will laugh at you for having a GCSE in Media because GCSEs are so inconsequential in the long run. You should do something that you obviously have an interest in, and it will sow the seeds for ideas and knowledge. Also make sure that you keep your other subjects fairly away from that, only because it's always good to have a back-up plan if the worst should happen and your dreams become a nightmare for whatever reason. Never put your eggs into one basket.

Whether you take your A-levels or not, work experience is an absolute essential asset because your grades won't mean jack without it. You might want to start with the BBC but I genuinely mean this: get it anywhere you can. Hospital radio - community radio - they're by far the easiest to get experience with, and you'll be far better off going down that route than hoping that the BBC give you something when they probably won't - and even if they do, you'll probably get nothing from them. Find your nearest community station, call them up and ask if they'll accomodate you for a week. Most are grateful for any help that they can get.

If you stay on for A-levels, Media Studies is preferable to continue giving you the theoretical knowledge that will come in useful to you. It may seem dull at times, but hindsight tells me that I'd be a lot worse off without it. I'd also suggest a secondary topic such as sociology, which many people overlook. It can be a dull subject, but it's such an important one (and piss-easy to pass) and well worth studying because it covers the habits of society and individuals and if you go to University and do Media there, you'll cover sociological debates and theories anyway, so it's best to have that in your pocket.

University isn't essential, but it's a great learning curve because you meet people interested in exactly what you are, trying to get into the business just like you. You'll obviously get to learn more theory, do more practical work and hone your skills, and there is always a student radio station that gives the necessary experience you'd want.

More importantly though, just practice at any point in the day that you can. Buy a computer microphone and record yourself for 30 minutes a night. I myself have about £200 worth of equipment here with an upgrade forthcoming, but you can make do with a free audio editor (Audacity is perfect) and a cheap PC mic. Work on your links, your ideas, and your voice. A lot of people put on a radio voice because most real voices suck a giant cock on air, so they hide it with a radio voice that can sound fake at first, but will eventually morph into your every day voice, making an in-between voice that you use all the time, that sounds better in all circumstances. Don't be scared by it - happens to everyone.

And most importantly, don't be afraid to realise that you suck. I don't mean that to be harsh, but most first time radio DJs are atrocious - their voices sound bad, they "umm" and "ahh" all the time, they don't know how to cover themselves when making a mistake, they have an annoying student laugh over things that aren't funny, and they care more about playing music they want people to hear rather than playing what people want to hear. 9 times out of 10, they're also copying someone else. It's PERFECTLY NATURAL! The good DJs are the ones who start out crap, stick with it, practice, listen to other shows, take notes, research, put time and effort into themselves, and continually push themselves to get better. If you have that, mixed with some experience (community radio) and a brain to you (GCSEs, A-levels and Uni), you should be fine.

Oh, and patience. Tonnes and tonnes of patience.

 

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From what I can see it seems to be quite a difficult career to get into, but everyone who has made it will have had the same struggles and difficulties you are facing, so it definitely wouldn't hurt to put out a few emails or phone calls to get some work experience. It might be quite difficult to get work experience until you are 16 though.

In terms of further education, try looking at brochures for unis and colleges as to what they would be looking for. Also check out their websites as to what they can offer you in terms of experience, such as student radio or even TV if you are interested in production.

Careers services may also be able to help you out, although my school careers advisor was a useless old hag so I would take what they say with a pinch of salt- if this is what you want then go for it :)

At the end of the day GCSEs aren't really that important- they are either a basis for further education or a way to show your interest to on the bottom rung of a long ladder... Taking subjects which reflect your interests should never hinder you, as long as you combine this with the basics (English and Maths, sorry) that will carry you through if you change your mind later on or need to take on other work part-time while gaining experience.

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You've got some good advice in this thread.

I work in production at BBC radio, and the way I've got to this stage is by making friends, contacts and connections at radio stations.

Email presenters and producers at your local radio stations, asking to come in for a visit. Doesn't sound much but once you're in the building you can start saying hello to people.

Join the forums at mediauk.com - it's full of industry professionals and it'll help you get up to speed on what's happening in the industry. There's also a Demo Critiques section so you can get some feedback on your presentation.

I hope that helps.

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Also, if I change my mind and want to be the next Perez Hilton I havent studied Broadcast Journalism alone but Journalism.

Would anyone seriously want to do that :P

On a serious not, I do understand what you mean.

The geek formally known as Scott Mills Guru

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I can't really add anything that everyone else hasn't said, but I'll just say what I'd do (and what I personally have done):

First of all, DO take Media Studies. No one will laugh at you for having a GCSE in Media because GCSEs are so inconsequential in the long run. You should do something that you obviously have an interest in, and it will sow the seeds for ideas and knowledge. Also make sure that you keep your other subjects fairly away from that, only because it's always good to have a back-up plan if the worst should happen and your dreams become a nightmare for whatever reason. Never put your eggs into one basket.

Whether you take your A-levels or not, work experience is an absolute essential asset because your grades won't mean jack without it. You might want to start with the BBC but I genuinely mean this: get it anywhere you can. Hospital radio - community radio - they're by far the easiest to get experience with, and you'll be far better off going down that route than hoping that the BBC give you something when they probably won't - and even if they do, you'll probably get nothing from them. Find your nearest community station, call them up and ask if they'll accomodate you for a week. Most are grateful for any help that they can get.

I think you have got it pretty much spot on throughout your post! I agree that one of the most important issues is to ensure that you have a fall plan, take subjects like business studies, geography etc as well as media just so you have something to fall back on should things not turn out how you would like! With the determination, there is no reason why you can't suceed.

You will need to also have the patience, as all the major local radio stations are slowly being taken over by huge umbrella companies, I imagine you will need patience more now than ever :)

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